Monthly Archives: July, 2012

NFL shutouts: When was the last time your team was shutout?

Denver Broncos logo

Denver Broncos logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a sports statistics blog that focuses on stats that go beyond the numbers.

National Football League training camps are open for business and that can mean only one thing: We are ready for some football!

Since 2000, there have been 99 shutouts in the NFL. Last season there were five, with the St. Louis Rams being shutout in a pair of games. The Raiders, Redskins and Seahawks were the other three teams shutout in a game in 2011. The fewest shutouts since 2000 was four in 2004, while the most shutouts in a season since 2000 were 15 in the 2006 regular season.

The Denver Broncos are the NFL franchise that has the longest  time span since their last shutout. The last time the Broncos were shutout was November 22, 1992, when they lost 24-0 to the Raiders. With the addition of Peyton Manning at QB, you have to wonder if that streak will continue to grow as long as Manning is at the helm. Manning’s Colts were never shutout in a regular-season game during his career in Indianapolis. They did lose one playoff game in January 2003 to the New York Jets, 41-0.

Following is the last time each of the NFL teams was shutout in a regular season game.

Year, team (date of shutout)

1992: Denver Broncos (11/22)

1993: Indianapolis Colts (12/26)

1996: New York Giants (12/1)

1999: San Diego Chargers (10/31)

2002: New Orleans Saints (1/6); Baltimore Ravens (9/15); Carolina Panthers (11/24); Chicago Bears (12/29)

2003: Arizona Cardinals (9/14); Dallas Cowboys (11/16); Houston Texans (12/7)

2004: Atlanta Falcons (12/5)

2006: Green Bay Packers (11/19); Pittsburgh Steelers (11/26); New England Patriots (12/10)

2007: Minnesota Vikings (11/11)

2008: Buffalo Bills (12/28)

2009: Cincinnati Bengals (1/3); Tampa Bay (9/27); Jacksonville Jaguars (10/11); Detroit Lions (10/18); Cleveland Browns (11/16)

2010: Philadelphia Eagles (1/3); New York Jets (10/31); Miami Dolphins (11/18); San Francisco 49ers (11/21); Tennessee Titans (11/28); Kansas City Chiefs (12/12)

2011: Seattle Seahawks (9/18); Oakland Raiders (10/23); Washington Redskins (10/30); St. Louis Rams (12/24)

Following are the number of times since 2000 that each team has been shutout.

11: Cleveland

7: Cincinnati, Miami

6: Oakland

5: Buffalo, St. Louis, Washington

4: Dallas, New York Jets, Pittsburgh, San Francisco

3: Chicago, Detroit, Kansas City, Philadelphia, Seattle, Tampa Bay, Tennessee

2: Arizona, Atlanta, Carolina, Green Bay, Jacksonville, New England

1: Baltimore, Houston, Minnesota, New Orleans

0: Denver, Indianapolis, New York Giants, San Diego

Just in case you were wondering, the defensive team with the most shutouts since 2000 are the Baltimore Ravens with nine. The Steelers have won with eight shutouts since 2000, and New England, Seattle and Tampa Bay have each had seven shutouts. Six different teams have not had a defensive shutout in this century: Arizona, Detroit, Minnesota, New Orleans, Philadelphia and Washington.

When you look at playoff games, there have been only 21 shutouts in playoff games since 1966 when the Super Bowl was first introduced. The last playoff shutout was in 2005 when the Carolina Panthers defeated the New York Giants 23-0 in an NFC first-round contest. The most shutouts in a playoff season were in 1985 when there were three. Two of those shutouts were wins by the Chicago Bears, who shutout the Giants and L.A. Rams on their way to winning the 1986 Super Bowl.

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Mike Trout looks to make history as batting champ and stolen base champ

Mike Trout

Mike Trout (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a sports statistics blog published with a focus on stats that go beyond the numbers.

Angels outfielder Mike Trout had a pair of hits in four at-bats in yesterday’s 11-6 win over the Kansas City Royals. Trout upped his league-leading batting average to .356, giving him a 20-point lead over White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko in the AL batting race.

Should Trout remain at the top of the AL batting average category, he would be the first Angels batting champion since 1970 when California Angels outfielder Alex Johnson won the crown with a .329 average.

While Trout is challenging history atop the batting leaders, he is also challenging for another piece of baseball history. Trout is leading the AL in stolen bases with 31. Should he win the stolen base crown and the batting crown, he would become the first AL player to do so since 2001 when Seattle’s Ichiro Suzuki won both categories. Jackie Robinson also accomplished this feat in 1949 when he led the National League in both categories. Trout would become the third player to accomplish this in 63 years, and the seventh player to do so since 1901.

Following are the players since 1901 who won both the league batting crown and league stolen base crown in the same year.

Led league in batting average and stolen bases

2001: Ichiro Suzuki, Seattle

1949: Jackie Robinson, Brooklyn

1945: Snuffy Stirnweiss, NY Yankees

1922: George Sisler, St. Louis Browns

1917: Ty Cobb, Detroit

1915: Ty Cobb, Detroit

1911: Ty Cobb, Detroit

1909: Ty Cobb, Detroit

1908: Honus Wagner, Pittsburgh

1907: Ty Cobb, Detroit and Honus Wagner, Pittsburgh

1904: Honus Wagner, Pittsburgh

A handful of players fell a little short of leading the league in both batting average and stolen bases. Following are the lists of players who led the league in one of the two categories but finished in second in the other, and players who finished as runner-up in both categories in a season.

Led league in batting average and was second in stolen bases

2004: Ichiro Suzuki, Seattle

1987: Tony Gwynn, San Diego

1974: Rod Carew, Minnesota

1958: Richie Ashburn, Philadelphia

1920: George Sisler, St. Louis Browns

1919: Ty Cobb, Detroit

Led league in stolen bases and was second in batting average

1990: Rickey Henderson, Oakland

1958: Willie Mays, San Francisco

1957: Willie Mays, San Francisco

1948: Richie Ashburn, Philadelphia

Was second in the league in both batting average and stolen bases

1961: Vada Pinson, Cincinnati

1955: Willie Mays, San Francisco

1951: Minnie Minoso, Chicago White Sox and Richie Ashburn, Philadelphia

1930: Babe Herman, Brooklyn

1914: Eddie Collins, Philadelphia A’s

1909: Eddie Collins. Philadelphia A’s

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2011 National League ROY finalists: Who’s suffering through the sophomore jinx in 2012?

English: Vance Worley, pitching for the Philad...

Phillies pitcher Vance Worley (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a sports statistics blog published with a focus on stats that go beyond the numbers.

Eight players last year received votes for the National League Rookie of the Year Award. Atlanta relief pitcher Craig Kimbrel was voted the league’s best rookie in 2011.

So how have these eight players performed this year? With the dreaded “sophomore jinx” hovering over their heads, which of these eight NL players are “beating the sophomore jinx,” which ones are “losing the sophomore jinx,” and for which players is it “too early to tell.”

Following is a summary of each player’s 2012 season and my take on their battle with the “sophomore jinx.”

Craig Kimbrel, Atlanta (2011 NL Rookie of the Year): The Atlanta reliever led the league in saves (46) and compiled a 4-3 record with a 2.10 ERA. This year he has 28 saves, a 0-1 record and an ERA of 1.42. His WHIP has dropped to 0.68 from 1.04. He was again an NL All-Star selection this year. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Beating the sophomore jinx.

Freddie Freeman, Atlanta (runner-up): The Braves first baseman hit .282 with 21 HRs and 76 RBI last season. His numbers this year are very comparable: A .275 average with 13 homers and 58 RBI. Has had a solid season and looks like he may challenge for a 100-RBI season. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Beating the sophomore jinx.

Vance Worley, Philadelphia (3rd place): The Phillies pitcher was 11-3 last year with a 3.01 ERA. This season he has a 5-6 record and an ERA of 3.82, with a WHIP that has increased to 1.39 from 1.23. Spent some time on the DL with a bone chip in his elbow and just has not regained the form from last year (a fate that seems to be haunting the Phillies as well). His ERA is respectable and he has made some quality starts. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Too early to tell.

Wilson Ramos, Washington (4th place): Ramos hit .267 with 15 HR and 52 RBI in 113 games with the Nationals last year. In May he tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee and was placed on the IR list for the season. He was hitting .265 in 25 games. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Lost to the sophomore jinx.

Josh Collmenter, Arizona (5th place): The Diamondback’ hurler was 10-10 last year with a 3.38 ERA. In eight starts this season he is 2-2 with a 3.82 ERA. After four early season starts and an 0-2 record (9.82 ERA) he was demoted from the starting rotation. Has pitched well in three starts in July, winning two games and allowing only four earned runs in 18 innings of work. Could be on the road back to last year’s form. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Too early to tell.

Danny Espinosa, Washington (6th place): The Nationals infielder batted .236 with 21 four-baggers and 66 RBI. His average this year is at .249, but his power and RBI numbers are lagging a bit. Having a really nice July with a .343 average, including batting .375 in his last seven games and a nine-game hitting streak. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Too early to tell.

Darwin Barney, Chicago Cubs (tied for 7th place): Cubs second baseman hit.276 last year. He has been solid all year and is hitting .262 and has doubled his HR output from last year to four this season. Has a 66-game errorless streak and has been outstanding in the field. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Beating the sophomore jinx.

Kenley Jansen, L.A. Dodgers (tied for 7th place): Working out of the Dodgers bullpen last season, Jansen was 2-1 with five saves and an ERA of 2.85. This season he has 19 saves, a WHIP under 1.00 (0.86), a 4-3 record and an ERA of 1.93. Has a great strikeout-to-walks ration with 70 K’s and only 18 walks. Has taken over the role as the Dodgers primary closer. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Beating the sophomore jinx.

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2011 American League ROY finalists: Who’s suffering the sophomore jinx?

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a sports statistics blog published with a focus on stats that go beyond the numbers.

Jeremy Hellickson

Jeremy Hellickson (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Eight players last year received votes for the American League Rookie of the Year. Tampa Bay pitcher Jeremy Hellickson was voted the league’s best rookie for the 2011 season.

So how have those eight players performed this season? With the dreaded “sophomore jinx” hovering over their heads, which of these eight A.L. players are “beating the sophomore jinx,” which ones are “losing to the sophomore jinx,” and for which players is it “too early to tell.”

Following is a summary of each players’ 2012 season and my take on their battle with the “sophomore jinx.”

Jeremy Hellickson, Tampa Bay (2011 AL Rookie of the Year): Hellickson was 13-10 with a 2.95 ERA in his award-winning season. This year, he has a 4-6 record and an ERA of 3.55. His WHIP has increased from 1.15 to 1.35. Has spent time on the DL this year with fatigue in his right shoulder. He is 0-4 in his last five starts with a 6.29 ERA. He has also been mentioned in some trade talk. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Losing to the sophomore jinx.

Mark Trumbo, L.A. Angels (runner-up): Trumbo hit .254 with 29 HR and 87 RBI last season. This year he already has 27 home runs and 66 RBI (on pace to drive in 113 for the season) and a batting average of .302. He leads the AL in slugging percentage and was an all-star selection. He has been a big factor in the Angels success this season. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Beating the sophomore jinx.

Eric Hosmer, Kansas City (3rd place): Last season Hosmer hit .293 with 19 HR and 78 RBI. To this point in the 2012 season, most of his numbers are down from last year: average down to .233, on-base pct. and slugging percentage down. His power numbers are on pace to match last year. There’s still time for him to get his average up. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Too early to tell.

Ivan Nova, N.Y. Yankees (4th place): The Yankees hurler was 16-4 last year with a 3.70 ERA. He is 10-4 this season with a 4.10 ERA. Most of his numbers are comparable to how he pitched last season. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Beating the sophomore jinx.

Michael Pineda, Seattle (5th place): After finishing fifth in the AL ROY balloting last season, Pineda was traded to the Yankees. He went on the DL at the end of spring training due to tendonitis in his right shoulder and eventually underwent surgery in May. He will be out for the 2012 season. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Lost to the sophomore jinx.

Dustin Ackley, Seattle (6th place): The Mariners second baseman hit .273 last year in 90 games. His 2012 season games is at about the number he played in his rookie year, and most of his numbers are down; average is at .224, on-base pct. and slugging pct. are also down. Has had a brutal July hitting only .149. The season is starting to get away from him. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Losing the sophomore jinx.

Desmond Jennings, Tampa Bay (tied for 7th place): The Rays outfielder hit .259 with 10 HRs in 63 games last year. His current average is around .240 and his other numbers are behind last year’s. He spent a little time on the DL this season, but a recent 6-for-18 stretch in his last five games may signal a turnaround to his season. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Too early to tell.

Jordan Walden, L.A. Angels (tied for 7th place): Walden was 5-5 with 32 saves and a 2.98 ERA in his rookie year. This year he is 2-2 with one save and a 3.86 ERA. His WHIP is up to 1.57 from last year’s 1.24. He lost his closer role in April after some early season struggles with his command. On the DL with a strain in his right bicep. SOPHOMORE JINX FACTOR: Losing the sophomore jinx.

Tomorrow: A look at the 2011 National League ROY finalists and how they are doing against the sophomore jinx.

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Ron Santo: Offensive numbers and Gold Gloves finally add up to a HOF invitation

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a sports statistics blog published with focus on stats that go beyond the numbers.

Cubs retired flag for Ron Santo

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chicago Cubs third baseman Ron Santo was inducted yesterday into baseball’s Hall of Fame. Santo was inducted after his election through the Golden Era Committee.

With offensive numbers that included 342 home runs, 1,331 RBI, a .277 career batting average and the National League leader in walks four times, and a resume that included nine All-Star Game selections, you would have assumed, like many people did, that Santo would have made an appearance in Cooperstown sooner.

Defensively, Santo was one of a handful of players who won five or more consecutive Gold Gloves. He won his each season from 1964-68. He is one of only seven third basemen to win five-plus consecutive Gold Gloves. They are:

Brooks Robinson (16) 1960-75

Mike Schmidt (9) 1976-84

Buddy Bell (6) 1979-84

Eric Chavez (6) 2001-06

Ron Santo (5) 1964-68

Doug Radar (5) 1970-74

Scott Rolen (5) 2000-04

Fifty-one different players have won the Gold Glove in five or more consecutive seasons (Note: It has happened 52 times; pitcher Greg Maddux accomplished this twice, once in 13 consecutive seasons, the other time in five straight seasons.) Following is a look at those players who hold the mark for most consecutive Gold Gloves at each position.

Pitcher: Jim Kaat (14) 1962-75

Catcher: Johnny Bench (10) 1968-77 and Ivan Rodriguez (10) 1992-2001

First Baseman: Keith Hernandez (11) 1978-88

Second Baseman: Ryne Sandberg (9) 1983-91

Third Baseman: Brooks Robinson (16) 1960-75

Shortstop: Ozzie Smith (13) 1980-1992

Outfielder: Willie Mays (12) 1957-68 and Roberto Clemente (12) 1961-72

In case you were wondering, here are the current longest streaks for most consecutive Gold Gloves:

4 years: Yadier Molina (catcher)

3 years: Mark Buehrle (pitcher)

2 years: Brandon Phillips (second baseman) and Troy Tulowitzki (shortstop)

Note: Seattle outfielder Ichiro Suzuki had his string of 10 straight Gold Gloves snapped last year.

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