SIX STATS you might not know about the first score in the Super Bowl

SBTD

How important is it to be the first team to score in the Super Bowl? In the previous 47 Super Bowl games, the team that scored first has won 31 times (65.6% winning percentage). Here’s a few more stats regarding the first score in the Super Bowl.

1. The first score in the Super Bowl has been either a field goal or touchdown pass in 80.9% of the games (38 of 47).

2. The first score has been a field goal in 22 games (46.8%). Of those 22, nine have been field goals of 40 yards or more. The first score has been a touchdown pass in 16 of the 47 Super Bowls (34%). Only four of those 16 TD passes were of 40 yards or more.

3. The first score has been a TD run in only five Super Bowl games. None of those five TD runs were longer than five yards. The last time a rushing TD was the first score in a Super Bowl was 1993 when Buffalo’s Thurman Thomas scored on a two-yard run. The first score has been a blocked punt for TD and kick return for TD once apiece.

4. The NFC has been the first team to score in 25 of the 47 games and in 13 of the last 19.

5. The first score in the Super Bowl has happened in the first quarter in 41 of the 47 games (87.2%) and in 17 of the last 19 contests. No Super Bowl game has been scoreless at halftime The lowest scoring Super Bowl game was Super Bowl IX between Pittsburgh and Minnesota. Pittsburgh scored a safety in the second quarter on their way to a 2-0 lead at halftime.

6. Three different players have scored the first points in two different Super Bowls. Kicker Mike Clark of Dallas did it with field goals in Super Bowl 5 and Super Bowl 6; the 49ers Jerry Rice put the first points on the board in Super Bowls 24 and 29 with TD receptions (in Super Bowl 24 from Joe Montana and in Super Bowl 29 from Steve Young); and Rams kicker Jeff Wilkins made field goals in Super Bowl 34 and Super Bowl 36 for the first scores in those games.

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

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