When 8 runs is not enough in the MLB playoffs

Kershaw

During the just-completed 2014 MLB regular season, there were 588 times when a team scored eight or more runs in a game. Teams won 559 of those times and lost 29, a winning percentage of just over 95 percent.

Take those numbers into the post-season and you wouldn’t expect many teams (maybe one at the most) to lose a game when they score eight or more runs in a post-season contest. This year’s MLB post-season, however, saw two teams in the first week of the playoffs score eight or more runs and lose a playoff game (and we’ve still got two rounds of playoffs remaining in the post-season).

The Oakland A’s had a 7-3 lead in the bottom of the eighth of their A.L. Wild Card game against the Kansas City Royals. The Royals came back in that game and won 9-8 in the 12th inning. Just three days later, the L.A. Dodgers scored nine runs in their N.L. Divisional Series first game loss to the St. Louis Cardinals. It was only the third time in MLB history that two teams that scored eight or more runs lost a playoff game in the same post-season (also 2004 and 1999).

From 1903 through the first few playoff games of this season, there have been 330 times when a team scored eight or more runs in a post-season game. Those teams won 312 and lost 18, a .945 winning percentage. Of those 18 losses, nine of them occurred in the World Series.

Following are the eight times when a team scored nine or more runs in a playoff game and lost.

Runs, team (score, series)

14: Philadelphia (lost 15-14 to Toronto in the 1993 World Series)

11: Cleveland (lost 14-11 to Florida in the 1997 World Series)

10: San Francisco (lost 11-10 to Anaheim in the 2002 World Series)

9: St. Louis (lost 11-9 to Boston in the 2004 World Series)
9: New York Mets (lost 15-9 to Atlanta in the 1999 NLCS)
9: New York Yankees (lost 10-9 to Pittsburgh in the 1960 World Series)
9: Texas (lost 10-9 to St. Louis in the 2011 World Series)
9: L.A. Dodgers (lost 10-9 to St. Louis in the 2014 NLDS)

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

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