Monthly Archives: January, 2018

Today’s Sports Stat: January 31, 2018


How important is the play of the quarterback in the Super Bowl? Consider this amazing stat:

Twenty-nine of the QBs whose team won the Super Bowl had a Passer Rating above 100.0 in the game. Only five QBs whose team lost the Super Bowl had a Passer Rating above 100.0 in that Super Bowl contest.

There have been only three Super Bowls where both QBs ended the game with a Passer Rating above 100.0 (year listed is the year the game was played):

1979: Pittsburgh over Dallas (Terry Bradshaw 119.2/Roger Staubach 100.4)

2004: New England over Carolina (Tom Brady 100.5/Jake Delhomme 113.6)

2015: New England over Seattle (Tom Brady 101.1/Russell Wilson 110.6)

In last year’s Super Bowl, we saw Matt Ryan finish the game with a 144.1 Passer Rating, the highest Passer Rating for a QB whose team lost the Super Bowl. (For the record, New England’s Tom Brady had a 95.2 Passer Rating in the contest.)

Here are the 10 QB who had the highest Passer Rating in a Super Bowl that their team lost.

Matt Ryan, 2017, Atlanta… 144.1
Jake Delhomme, 2004, Carolina… 113.6
Kurt Warner, 2009, Arizona… 112.3
Russell Wilson, 2015, Seattle… 110.6
Roger Staubach, 1979, Dallas… 100.4
Ken Anderson, 1982, Cincinnati… 95.2
Colin Kapernick, 2013, San Francisco… 91.7
Tom Brady, 2012, New England… 91.1
Brett Favre, 1998, Green Bay… 91.0
Peyton Manning, 2010, Indianapolis… 88.5

In case you were wondering, the worst Passer Rating for a QB whose team lost the Super Bowl was Craig Morton for Denver in 1978; his Passer Rating in that game was 0.0.
 

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Today’s Sports Stat: January 30, 2018


Imagine being an NBA player and you look at your stat sheet after the game and discover that you missed every shot from the field (to be honest, you probably already know that). Maybe you went 0-for-5, or worse yet, maybe 0-for-9. Pretty embarrassing, huh?

Well, how about if the stat sheet showed you went 0-for-13 from the field in a game? That recently happened to Phoenix rookie Josh Jackson; he went 0-for-13 in a game on January 28 versus the Houston Rockets.

According to research on pro basketball-reference.com, Tim Hardaway holds the NBA record for most shots taken without a made field goal. Hardaway on December 27, 1991 went 0-for-17 as a member of the Golden State Warriors in a game versus Minnesota. He was 0-for-15 on two-point shots and then went 0-for-two on three-point attempts. The only saving grace for Hardaway that game was that he made both of his free throw attempts.

Three other players went 0-for-15 in an NBA game: Bob Love on March 12, 1976 with the Chicago Bulls; Rodney McCray on November 9, 1988 with Sacramento; and Ray Williams on December 28, 1981 with the New Jersey Nets.

Fourteen different NBA players have played in two or more games where they attempted 10 or more shots and did not make any of them. Antawn Jamison leads this group by doing it in three different games. The thirteen players who went 0-for-10 or worse in two games are: Rafer Alston, Derek Anderson, Junior Bridgeman, Quinten Dailey, Antonio Daniels, Antonio Davis, Devean George, Vernon Maxwell, Andre Miller, Paul Pierce, Quentin Richardson, Doc Rivers and Jason Terry.

In case you Bucks fans were wondering, Junior Bridgeman holds the team record for most shots attempted in a game without a made shot; he went 0-for-14 on January 24, 1984 in a game versus the Washington Bullets.

 

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Today’s Sports Stat: January 29, 2018


For the fourth time in the last five years, the Super Bowl will feature the two teams that were their respective conference’s number one seeds, the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles.

Last season, the AFC’s #1 seeded Patriots squared off against the NFC’s #2 seeded Atlanta Falcons.

The last time the Super Bowl featured no #1 seeded teams was after the 2012 season when #4 seeded Baltimore Ravens faced the #2 seeded San Francisco 49ers. In fact, since 1975 when the NFL went to a seeded format for the post-season, there has only been seven times when no #1 seed played in the Super Bowl. Here are those seasons:

1979: L.A. Rams versus Pittsburgh
1980: Philadelphia versus Oakland
1992: Dallas versus Buffalo
1997: Green Bay versus Denver
2008: Arizona versus Pittsburgh
2010: Green Bay versus Pittsburgh
2012: San Francisco versus Baltimore

If you were wondering why it’s so important to get that #1 conference seed for the playoffs, consider this:

  • Of the 86 teams that have played in the Super Bowl since 1975 (when the seeded format was instituted), 49 were #1 seeds (57%); 20 were #2 seeds (23.3%); 4 were #3 seeds; nine were #4 seeds; two were #5 seeds; and 2 were #6 seeds.
  • Of the 42 Super Bowl winners since 1975, 24 (57%) were #1 seeds. The #2 seed has won eight times; the #3 seed has won twice; the #4 seed has five Super Bowl titles; the #5 seed has won once; and the #6 seed has won twice.

 

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Today’s Sports Stat: January 27, 2018


The Hall of Fame case for Edgar Martinez: Part 2

I have to admit that Seattle Mariners third baseman/DH Edgar Martinez was not really on my radar when I thought about players who might be elected to Baseball’s Hall of Fame in 2018.

But after seeing him receive over 70% of the vote (still falling short of the required 75%), and looking closer at his numbers, I have certainly taken notice. In fact, it looks like 2019 will be his year.

Following is the second in a two-part series on the case for Edgar Martinez induction into Baseball’s Hall of Fame.

 

Friends and family of Edgar Martinez should feel good about his chances for induction into Baseball’s Hall of Fame in 2019. Consider this:

  • Martinez became the 29th player to receive more than 70% of the votes in Hall induction in a year, but less than the required 75%. Of the previous 28 players who received between 70-74.9% of the vote in a year, 22 of those players got in the Hall the following year with more than the required 75% of the vote. Of the six that did not, two, Luke Appling and Red Ruffing got into the Hall in special “run-off elections” shortly thereafter, and four (Frank Chance, Nellie Fox, Jim Bunning and Orlando Cepeda) eventually were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame via the Veteran’s Committee selection.
  • Since 2000, nine players received between 70-74.9% of Hall of Fame votes in a year and then all received the required 75% the following year. The nine: Gary Carter (2002), Goose Gossage (2007), Jim Rice (2008), Bert Blyleven and Roberto Alomar (2010), Craig Biggio (2014), Jeff Bagwell (2016), Trevor Hoffman and Vladimir Guerrero (2017).
  • Jim Bunning is the only player in Hall of Fame voting to receive between 70-74.9% of the vote in a year twice. He received 70.0% in 1987 and 74.2% in 1988. He was eventually voted in to the Hall by the Veteran’s Committee in 1996.

For the record, six different players received between 74-74.9% of the vote in a year: Nellie Fox (74.7% in 1985), Billy Williams (74.1% in 1986), Bunning (74.2% in 1988), Bert Blyleven (74.2% in 2010), Craig Biggio (74.8% in 2014) and Trevor Hoffman (74.0% in 2017).

 

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Today’s Sports Stat: January 26, 2018


The Hall of Fame case for Edgar Martinez: Part 1

I have to admit that Seattle Mariners third baseman/DH Edgar Martinez was not really on my radar when I thought about players who might be elected to Baseball’s Hall of Fame in 2018.

But after seeing him receive over 70% of the vote (still falling short of the required 75%), and looking closer at his numbers, I have certainly taken notice. In fact, it looks like 2019 will be his year.

Following is a two-part series in the case for Edgar Martinez for Baseball’s Hall of Fame.

Here are several stats you may not know about Edgar Martinez’s career.

  • Martinez is one of only 62 players in baseball history to have four or more seasons with 100 runs scored and 100 RBIs in the same season. Lou Gehrig tops this list with 13 such seasons.
  • Although he had 2,247 career hits (ranking 172nd on the all-time hit list), Edgar never had 200 hits. He did, however, have 140 or more hits in 11 of his 18 seasons in the majors. He is one of 122 players to have 11 seasons with 140 or more hits.
  • Martinez had five 40-doubles seasons, making his one of only 28 MLB players to reach that stat. Tris Speaker tops this stat with 10 40-doubles seasons.
  • Martinez had 309 career HRs and 1261 career RBI. He is one of 102 players to reach 300-1200 in a career; 48 of those 102 are already in the Hall.
  • Edgar had 1,283 career walks and 1,202 career strikeouts. His walk total ranks 47th in MLB history. Of all players with 1,200 or more career walks, Martinez is one of only 34 to have more walks than strikeouts in his career.
  • Martinez had 10 .300 seasons (minimum of 100 games played in those seasons). That makes him one of only 54 players to have 10 .300 seasons. Of the 54 players on this list, 41 are already in the Hall of Fame.
  • A seven-time All-Star, Edgar played in 2,055 games, all with Seattle. He is one of 226 players with 2,000 or more career games played, but he is one of only 34 players to have played all of their 2,000+ games with one team.
  • He is one of 63 players who had eight or more post-season home runs.
  • His 1,607 hits as a DH ranks third all-time.
  • Martinez had a career .312 batting average, a career .418 one-base percentage, and a career .515 career slugging percentage. He is one of only 22 players in baseball history to have a career batting average over .300, a career on-base percentage over .400, and a career slugging percentage over .500. Of those 22 players, 14 are already in the Hall of Fame. Of the eight that are not, Joey Votto and Mike Trout are still active… Martinez, Todd Helton, Manny Ramirez and Larry Walker are currently on the Hall of Fame ballot… and a pair of old-timers, Lefty O’Doul and Shoeless Joe Jackson, complete the list of eight.

 

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