Tag Archives: Barry Bonds

Teammates with 80-plus extra-base hits in a season

Chris Davis

Chris Davis (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a sports statistics blog published with a focus on stats that go beyond the numbers.

Baltimore Orioles first baseman Chris Davis has 75 extra-base hits (42 home runs and 33 doubles) this season, most in the majors. He is on pace to have 103 extra-base hits for the season. Should he get to 100 (and potentially, beyond that), he would become the 13th player in baseball history to have 100-plus extra-base hits in a season (three players accomplished the feat twice in their careers).

The question, however, is will Davis have one of his teammates join him in the 80-plus extra-base hit club? Manny Machado has 55 extra-base hits in 2013 and Adam Jones is close behind with 54. Both of these players are on a pace to end up with about 75 for the season.

Teammates with 80-plus extra-base hits in a season has happened 34 times since 1901. Last season, Brewers teammates Ryan Braun and Aramis Ramirez each had 80 extra-base hits, making them the first set of Brewers teammates to accomplish that. They were also the first teammates with 80-plus extra-base hits since 2008 when St. Louis’ Ryan Ludwig (80) and Albert Pujols (81) reached that mark.

Here’s a look at the teammates that had 80-plus extra-base hits in a season since 2000.

Season, Team, Players
2012, Milwaukee: Ryan Braun (80) and Aramis Ramirez (80)
2008, St. Louis: Ryan Ludwig (80) and Albert Pujols (81)
2007, Detroit: Curtis Granderson (84) and Magglio Ordonez (82)
2007, Florida: Hanley Ramirez (83) and Dan Uggla (83)
2005, Texas: Alfonso Soriano (81) and Mark Teixeira (87)
2004, Boston: David Ortiz (91) and Manny Ramirez (87)
2004, Colorado: Vinny Castilla (81) and Todd Helton (83)
2004, St. Louis: Jim Edmonds (83) and Albert Pujols (99)
2003, Colorado: Todd Helton (87) and Preston Wilson (80)
2003, Toronto: Carlos Delgado (81) and Vernon Wells (87)
2001, Houston: Lance Berkman (94) and Jeff Bagwell (86)
2001, Texas: Alex Rodriguez (87) and Rafael Palmeiro (80)
2000, Houston: Jeff Bagwell (85) and Richard Hidalgo (89)
2000, San Francisco: Barry Bonds (81) and Jeff Kent (81)

Here’s a few more stats about extra-base hits in a season:

* The New Yankees have had teammates with 80-plus extra-base hits most often in MLB history with eight. However, the last time they accomplished that was in 1937.

* Lou Gehrig tops the list of most seasons with 80 or more extra-base hits with 10. He is followed by Babe Ruth and Albert Pujols with nine each.

* Babe Ruth holds the MLB record for most extra-base hits in a season with 119 in 1921. The last time a player had 100 or more extra-base hits in a season was 2001 when four players cracked the 100 mark: Barry Bonds, Todd Helton, Sammy Sosa and Luis Gonzalez.

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

White Sox Paul Konerko looks for a ‘greybeard’ batting title

Paul Konerko

Paul Konerko (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a sports statistics blog published daily that focuses on stats that go beyond the numbers.

There’s still a lot of games yet to be played in the season, but we are seeing a couple of interesting developments in the batting races. Chicago White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko is sitting atop the American League with a .346 average. Should he eventually win the title, Konerko, age 36, would become the oldest A.L. batting champ since 1990 when 37-year-old George Brett won the crown.

Since 1987, there have been 21 players age 30+ who won a batting title. The last was in 2008 when 36-year-old Chipper Jones won the National League batting title. The last 30-something player to win an American League batting championship was in 2007 when 33-year-old Magglio Ordonez had the highest average.

Following are the oldest players to win a batting crown in the last 25 years.

Age, Player, Batting Average

39 Barry Bonds, 362

37 Barry Bonds, .370

37 Tony Gwynn, .372

37 George Brett, .329

36 Chipper Jones, .364

36 Tony Gwynn, .353

35 Tony Gwynn, .368

Of the 50 batting champions since 1987 (25 in the A.L., 25 in the N.L.), 22 were in the age range of 25-29 when they won the title. Fifteen were age 30-34, seven were age 35-39, and six were age 20-24. The most common age of a batting champ since 1987 was 29 with eight players. The Top Five ages:

Age 29: Eight batting champs

Age 32: Five batting champs

Age 28: Five batting champs

Age 26: Four batting champs

Age 30: Four batting champs

Also interesting is that with Konerko and Cincinnati Reds first baseman Joey Votto leading their respective league in batting average, could we be looking at the first pair of first basemen to win batting titles since 1993? In ’93, Colorado’s Andres Galarraga won the N.L. batting crown with a .370 average, and Toronto first sacker John Olerud captured the A.L. batting title with a .363 average.

Outfielders have won the most batting titles since 1987 with 23. Here’s a look at the positions that have won the most batting titles in the last 25 seasons.

Position, Batting titles since 1987

Outfielders: 23

First Basemen: 8

Third Basemen: 8

Shortstops: 6

Catchers: 3

Second Baseman: 1

Designated Hitters: 1

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

SIX STATS you might not know about… Ryan Braun’s 2011 N.L. MVP award

Ryan Braun

Ryan Braun... Image via Wikipedia

“SIX STATS…” is a bonus feature of Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ and is published every Friday.

With all the excitement about the Packers unbeaten season and the Wisconsin Badgers football team’s journey to the postseason, haven’t had an appropriate tribute to Ryan Braun‘s National League MVP honor. Here’s a look at some of the stats behind the honor.

1. Braun and Prince Fielder became the first teammates since 2000 to finish in the top 3 in the National League MVP balloting (Jeff Kent and Barry Bonds of the San Francisco Giants finished 1-2 in the 2000 NL MVP Award.) Twenty-three sets of teammates have finished in the Top 3 of A.L. or N.L. MVP balloting since 1970. The last American League duo was New York’s Mark Teixeira and Derek Jeter who finished 2-3 in 2009.

2. This was the first year in Major League history that the two winners of the MVP awards were former Rookie of the Year recipients. Braun was N.L. ROY in 2007; Justin Verlander was A.L. ROY in 2006.

3. As noted above, Braun was N.L. ROY in 2007. The A.L. ROY that year was Boston’s Dustin Pedroia. Braun won the N.L. MVP this year, Pedroia was A.L. MVP in 2008. This is the first time in baseball history that two Rookie of the Years from the same year have both gone on to win an MVP award.

4. Braun became the 22nd player in baseball history to win a Rookie of the Year award and a league MVP honor. Of the 22 players who have accomplished this feat, nine are currently in baseball’s Hall of Fame: Jackie Robinson, Willie Mays, Frank Robinson, Orlando Cepeda, Billy Williams, Rod Carew, Johnny Bench, Andre Dawson and Cal Ripken, Jr. Of those 22 players, 14 of them won their MVP award within five years of winning their ROY honor. Both Braun and Verlander joined that group this year.

5. Since 2007 when Braun began his major league career, he has received votes for the league MVP each of the five years of his five-year MLB career. The only other players to have received MVP votes in each of the past five years are: Ryan Howard, Albert Pujols, Miguel Cabrera and Adrian Gonzalez.

6. Braun became the fourth Brewers player to finish in the Top 5 of the league MVP in two or more seasons. Can you name the other three players? Braun finished in the Top 5 of the league MVP in 2008 and 2011; Fielder finished in the Top 5 in 2007, 2009 and 2011; Robin Yount in 1982 and 1989 (he won the award both years) and Cecil Cooper, who finished in the Top 5 in 1980, 1982 and 1983.

Where does Albert Pujols rank among baseball’s all-time greatest hitters?

Photo by Rafael Amado©

Albert Pujols... Image via Wikipedia

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a biweekly blog that is published every Wednesday and Friday with a bonus “SIX STATS…” posting every Friday.

With his three HRs in Game Three of the World Series, St. Louis Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols continues to build an impressive resume that will likely get him into baseball’s Hall of Fame five years after his retirement. He has won three National League MVP awards (and finished second in the balloting three times), was the N.L. Rookie of the Year in 2001, and has been selected to nine N.L. All-Star teams.

But here’s the question: Where does Pujols rank among baseball’s all-time greatest hitters? Consider… a .328 career batting average, 445 homers and 100 or more RBIs in ten of his 11 seasons. Great credentials and numbers!

Let me offer the following criteria to analyze Pujols and how he compares with the other great hitters in the game’s history. My definition of a great hitter would include a player who hits for a high average, someone who hits for power, and a hitter with a great eye at the plate. To quantify what I just said, let’s look at how many hitters have accomplished the following in a season (Why the following criteria? It’s my blog!):

* Hit .300 or better

* Hit 30 or more home runs

* Walk 100 or more times

* Strike out less than 100 times.

With these numbers as a definition of a player who had a “great hitter” season, we see that only 28 players have had one or more “great hitter” seasons in major league history. In fact, this year only one player met the above criteria: Miguel Cabrera of the Detroit Tigers. Cabrera hit .344, slugged 30 home runs, walked 108 times and struck out 89 times.

Following are the players in baseball history who had one or more seasons where they batted over .300, hit 30 or more HRs, walked 100 or more times, and had less than 100 strikeouts.

‘Great Hitter’ Seasons, Player

11….. Babe Ruth

9….. Lou Gehrig, Barry Bonds

8….. Ted Williams

5….. Jimmie Foxx, Frank Thomas

4….. Mel Ott, Mickey Mantle

3….. Stan Musial, Gary Sheffield, Albert Pujols

2….. Ralph Kiner, Jason Giambi, Todd Helton

1….. Hack Wilson, Hank Greenberg, Duke Snider, Norm Cash, Willie McCovey, Carl Yastrzemski, Reggie Smith, George Brett, Dwight Evans, Jeff Bagwell, Chipper Jones, Brian Giles, Luis Gonzales

There’s no doubt that Pujols is one of the game’s greatest players and is definitely one of its great hitters. Exactly where does he rank among the greatest hitters? You be the judge! In fact, send me your ranking of your three greatest hitters in major league history. We’ll see how the voting plays out.