Tag Archives: Mike McCarthy

Today’s Sports Stat: July 23, 2018

The Green Bay Packers have had Mike McCarthy as their head coach for 12 seasons. During that time the team has compiled a 121-70-1 record.

Did you know that in the McCarthy era the Packers have their best record in Game #6 and Game #13 contests (both 10-2) and their worst record in Game #8 contests (4-8)? In fact, there are games where the Packers are not above .500 in the past 12 years… Game #5, Game #8, Game #11 and Game #14

Here’s a look at the Packers record in each of the 16 games of the season since McCarthy took over as head coach.

Game #1: 8-4
Game #2: 8-4
Game #3: 7-5
Game #4: 9-3
Game #5: 6-6
Game #6: 10-2
Game #7: 8-4
Game #8: 4-8
Game #9: 8-4
Game #10: 8-4
Game #11: 5-6-1
Game #12: 8-4
Game #13: 10-2
Game #14: 6-6
Game #15: 7-5
Game #16: 9-3

Looking at this year’s schedule, the Packers play a pair of home games for Games #6 and #13; they play the 49ers at home in game #6 and Arizona at Lambeau Field in Game #13.

In the four games where they are not above .500, the Pack in 2018 play the Lions in Detroit in Game #5, the Rams in Los Angeles in Game #8, the Seahawks in Seattle in Game #11, and are at home against the Atlanta Falcons in Game #14.

 

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

Packerstats 2017: Game 7, 26-17 loss to New Orleans

Here are some of the numbers that helped define the Packers 26-17 loss to the New Orleans Saints on October 22.

  • The loss to the Saints was the fourth straight loss to an NFC South team. The Packers have lost five of their last seven to NFC South opponents.
  • The Packers lost their last game before the bye week for the first time since 2014 when they lost to the same Saints prior to their bye week that season. Green Bay is 5-3 in the games prior to the bye week since 2010.
  • Drew Brees’ 84.4 Passer Rating in the game was the lowest of his career versus the Packers. He did, however, have his seventh consecutive game with 300 or more passing yards against the Pack. Brees is the only opposing QB to have a 135 or higher Passer Rating against the Packers twice in his career.
  • Aaron Jones’ 46-yard TD run was the longest run for the Packers this season.
  • Scoring first in home games is usually a good sign for Green Bay. They are now 39-6-1 (.859 winning percentage) in games at Lambeau since 2010 when they score first in the contest.
  • Damarious Randall had an interception for the third consecutive games. It was the first time a Packer defender had an interception in three consecutive games since Casey Hayward did it in Games, 5-6-7 in the 2012 campaign.
  • Green Bay is now 79-15 (.840) since 2000 in games where the defense gets two or more interceptions.
  • The Saints did not score in the first quarter. Since 2010, Green Bay is now 44-12 (.786) in games when they hold opponents scoreless in the first quarter. The loss yesterday at Lambeau was only the third time since 2010 that the team lost a game when they held the opponents scoreless in the first quarter; they are now 32-3 since 2010.
  • Green Bay held a 14-7 halftime lead. The Packers are 48-2 in the Mike McCarthy era (since 2006) at Lambeau Field when they have a lead of seven points or more at halftime. The other loss was on October 7, 2007… the Packers had a 17-7 halftime lead over the Bears but lost that home game 27-20.
  • The Pack had 181 yards rushing in the game, the most since they had 226 versus the Bears last season. Green Bay is 4-3-1 since 2013 in games where they get 180 or more yards rushing in a contest.
  • New Orleans held a 16-14 lead over the Packers going into the fourth quarter. Green Bay is 5-11-1 at home in their last 16 games when they are behind going into the last quarter.
  • Green Bay did not score a point in the third quarter. They have now lost 14 of their last 20 when they are held scoreless in the third quarter. They are 25-34-1 (.425) under Mike McCarthy when they do not score in the third quarter.
  • New Orleans had 485 total yards of offense in the game. Since 2010, Green Bay is 10-7 when the “D” allows 450 or more total yards in a game. They have, however, lost three straight and seven of their last 11 games when they give up 450+ yards to an opponent.
  • Packers rookie running back Aaron Jones had 131 yards rushing on 17 carries. It was his second 100-yard game this season. He joins four other rookie running backs for the Packers to have two or more 100-yard rushing games in their rookie campaigns with the Pack. The others: Eddie Lacy, Ryan Grant, Samkon Gado and John Brockington. Grant leads this group with five 100-yard games as a Packers rookie.
  • Green Bay had only 23:04 time of possession in the game. Since 2000, Green Bay is 5-15 (.333) in games when they have less than 24 minutes time of possession in a game.
  • Green Bay had only 79 yards passing in the game. It was the fourth time with McCarthy as head coach that the team was held to under 100 yards in the passing game. They are now 0-4 in those games. They also had no TD passes in the contest. Green Bay is 8-14 since 2006 (.364) when they did not have a TD pass in a game.
  • The Pack has now lost nine of their last 10 when they are held under 20 points in a game. Under McCarthy, the team is 11-32 in games when they score less than 20 in a game, 7-10 (.418) in home games.

40 Packers Stats Until Opening Kickoff-August 26 (#15)

(From August 1 until the first regular season game against the Seattle Seahawks on September 10, we’ll give you a daily dose of Packers stats.)

Green Bay head coach Mike McCarthy enters the 2017 campaign with 124 coaching wins (regular season and playoffs). That ranks 29th all-time among coaches.

Of the active coaches in the NFL, McCarthy’s 124 wins rank 4th. Can you name the three current coaches in the NFL who have more coaching wins than McCarthy? If you answered Bill Belichick, John Fox and Andy Reid, you would be correct.

Here are the active head coaches with the most wins. (Current team that they are coaching is also listed.)

Bill Belichick, New England, 263
Andy Reid, Kansas City, 184
John Fox, Chicago, 136
Mike McCarthy, Green Bay, 124
Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati, 118
Pete Carroll, Seattle, 113
Mike Tomlin, Pittsburgh, 111
Sean Payton, New Orleans, 100
John Harbaugh, Baltimore, 95
Jack Del Rio, Oakland, 88
Jason Garrett, Dallas, 59
Ron Rivera, Carolina, 56
Jim Caldwell, Detroit, 55
Chuck Pagano, Indianapolis, 52

Is Aaron Rodgers the NFL’s best QB ‘quarter by quarter?’

Aaron Rodgers 2011-5

(Photo credit: elviskennedy)

If you want to get into a heated debate, start a discussion about who is the best quarterback in the NFL today. Is it Peyton Manning? Aaron Rodgers? Tom Brady? Drew Brees? How about Russell Wilson, RG III or Andrew Luck?

Everyone has their own criteria for determining the best. Let me offer some thoughts for discussion.

First, let’s use the Passer Rating as the numerical yardstick. Secondly, let’s look at how well QBs perform in each quarter. Are some QBs better in the first quarter and less effective in the fourth quarter.

Following is a breakdown of the QBs with the best Passer Ratings since 2010 in the first, second, third and fourth quarters (minimum of 100 passes attempted in each quarter to qualify for the list).

First Quarter
1. Aaron Rodgers, 114.4
2. Drew Brees, 109.8
3. Russell Wilson, 107.5
4. Andrew Luck, 105.6
5. Matt Ryan, 103.5

Second Quarter
1. Peyton Manning, 111.8
2. Shaun Hill, 111.6
3. Russell Wilson, 107.3
4. Robert Griffin III, 105.1
5. Aaron Rodgers, 102.8

Third Quarter
1. Aaron Rodgers, 117.1
2. Philip Rivers, 108.7
3. Colin Kaepernick, 106.1
4. Peyton Manning, 105.9
5. Matt Schaub, 103.2

Fourth Quarter
1. Aaron Rodgers, 108.9
2. Peyton Manning, 101.7
3. Tony Romo, 100.6
4. Tom Brady, 98.8
5. Russell Wilson, 98.2

Based on the numbers above, we discover some interesting talking points:

* Rodgers is the only QB who had a 100 or higher rating in each of the four quarters.

* Brees and Brady had a 100 Passer Rating in the first, second and third quarters, but not the fourth.

* Rodgers, Peyton and Tony Romo were the only QBs to have a 100 Passer Rating in both the third and fourth quarters.

Let’s look at the 2013 season. Peyton Manning is having a great season and his Broncos have been an early season favorite to make it to the Super Bowl. Peyton has the highest Passer Rating this season of QBs in the first and fourth quarters. Peyton’s Passer Rating is 128.9 in the first quarter and 124.3 in the fourth quarter. Seattle Russell Wilson has the best second quarter rating at 127.34, and Cam Newton has the best third quarter rating at 139.1.

For those Aaron Rodgers fans wondering where Rodgers is at in these 2013 by-quarter Passer Ratings, he is still near the top. His first quarter rating is 106.7, second quarter 93.3, third quarter 117.2, and fourth quarter 105.1. Rodgers is very consistent in his overall passing performance over the course of a game; but it is interesting to note that he seems to do his best work (statistically) in the third quarter, yet the second quarter is his worst (in terms of Passer Rating) of the four quarters. Theories? I’ll throw one out there: Rodgers and his coach Mike McCarthy may be the best at making adjustments at halftime to what their offense needs to do to be successful in the second half.

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

Failure to capitalize on great starting field position doomed Packers

Green Bay Packers Head Coach Mike McCarthy. Ph...

Green Bay Packers Head Coach Mike McCarthy was not smiling about his offense’s execution in the game against the Bengals. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sports Stats ‘on Tapp’ is a sports statistics blog published with a focus on stats that go beyond the numbers.

Monday Morning quarterbacks and Packers fans in general are trying to figure out how the team could create four takeaways, score 30 unanswered points, and still find a way to lose yesterday’s game to the Cincinnati Bengals, Well, here’s my two cents… this simple stat may be the answer.

The Packers yesterday had great starting field position on six drives. They started at their own 40, twice at their own 42 yard line, once at the Cincinnati 37, and twice inside the Cincinnati 30-yard line. And what did they have to show for those six great starting field positions? Two field goals. Six points. On the other four possessions, the Pack had two punts and two interceptions. Scoring only six points with six starting field possessions with 60 yards or less to go to score is I’m sure not what Mike McCarthy expected.

Here’s a little comparison to put this in perspective: In the first two weeks of the NFL season, there were 134 drives where teams started at their own 40-yard line or better. Of those, 79 resulted in either a TD or field goal (59% of the possessions). The Packers were two of six (only 33%). Of those 134 possessions, TDs were scored on 47 of those drives (35%). The Packers scored zero touchdowns in their six possessions from their own 40-yard line or better. Zero percent!

Scoring only six points on those six possessions was bad enough. But when you play in a close game and lose by only four points, every possession is important. To start at the Cincinnati 37-yard line, lose 15 yards and then have to punt the ball… there’s no excuse for not putting at least three points on the board when you have that kind of starting field position. Then to have to settle for two field goals when they started inside the Cincinnati 30, again… if you’re looking for why the Packers lost yesterday’s game, not capitalizing on great starting field position has to be a key factor.

One final stat: Teams that started two or more drives in their opponents’ territory in games were 18-3 the first two weeks of the NFL season.

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp