Tag Archives: MLB

Last season each MLB team finished in last place

Last season the Atlanta Braves were one of six teams to finish in last place in their division. What makes this all the more interesting is that it was their first year in last place since 1990, a span of 26 years!

The other five teams that finished in last place were Cincinnati, Minnesota, Oakland, San Diego and Tampa Bay. For Oakland and Cincinnati, they also finished in last place in 2015. The Twins last season as a cellar-dweller was in 2014; the Padres last time was in 2011; and the Rays last finished in last place in their division in 2007.

Over the last three seasons, 13 of the 30 MLB teams finished in last place in their division in at least one season. But it’s interesting to note that five MLB teams have not finished in last place in their division this century (since 2000) and two of those five (the New York Yankees and St. Louis Cardinals) have not finished in last place since 1990.

Following is a look at the last season each of the 30 MLB teams finished in last place in their division.

1990: New York Yankees, St. Louis Cardinals
1991: Cleveland
1992: Los Angeles Dodgers
1999: Los Angeles Angels
2003: New York Mets
2004: Milwaukee
2007: San Francisco
2010: Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Washington
2011: Baltimore
2012: Seattle
2013: Chicago White Sox, Houston, Miami, Toronto
2014: Arizona, Chicago Cubs, Texas
2015: Boston, Colorado, Detroit, Philadelphia
2016: Atlanta, Cincinnati, Minnesota, Oakland, San Diego, Tampa Bay

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MLB Stats: 60-40 teammates

If you are a Brewers fan, you already know that Jonathan Villar led the majors last season with 62 stolen bases and that Chris Carter tied for the National League home run title with 41 homers. But what you may not know is that these (now-former) Brewers teammates in 2016 became the fifth set of MLB teammates to have a 60-40 season… one player with 60 or more steals and a teammate with 40 or more HRs.

Here’s a look at the five sets of teammates who had a 60-40 season in the same year:

Milwaukee Brewers, 2016: Chris Carter, 41 HRs, Jonathan Villar, 62 stolen bases.
New York Mets, 2006: Carlos Beltran, 41 HRs, Jose Reyes, 64 stolen bases.
New York Mets, 1999: Mike Piazza, 40 HRs, Roger Cedeno, 66 stolen bases.
Cleveland Indians, 1996: Albert Belle, 48 HRs, Kenny Lofton, 75 stolen bases.
New York Yankees, 1931: Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, 46 HRs each, Ben Chapman, 61 stolen bases.

The combined stats of HRs and stolen bases has always been a way to evaluate those players who have that rare, much-desired combination of speed and power. The most common stat has been the “30-30” players, those who get 30 or more HRs and 30 or more steals in the same season. The Brewers franchise has had two 30-30 players in its history: Ryan  Braun has done it twice (in 2011 and 2012), and Tommy Harper did it in 1970. In fact, Braun and Mike Trout are the last two players to have a 30-30 season, both accomplishing this feat in 2012. Braun is one of 13 MLB players in history to have two or more 30-30 seasons… father and son Barry and Bobby Bonds top this list, each with five 30-30 seasons in their careers.

In addition to Braun’s two 30-30 seasons and Harper’s lone 30-30 campaign, the Brewers team has had nine other seasons where teammates accomplished a 30-30 season… one player with 30 or more HRs and a teammate with 30 or more stolen bases. Here’s a look at those seasons:

2016: HRs-Chris Carter (41) and Ryan Braun (30)/Stolen Bases-Jonathan Villar (62) and Hernan Perez (34)

2012: HRs-Corey Hart (30) and Ryan Braun (41)/Stolen Bases-Nori Aoki (30), Carlos Gomez (37) and Ryan Braun (30)

2011: HRs-Prince Fielder (38) and Ryan Braun (33)/Stolen Bases-Ryan Braun (33)

2003: HRs-Richie Sexson (45)/Stolen Bases-Scott Podsednik (43)

1983: HRs-Cecil Cooper (30)/Stolen Bases-Paul Molitor (41)

1982: HRs-Ben Oglivie (34) and Gorman Thomas (39)/Stolen Bases-Paul Molitor (41)

1980: HRs-Ben Oglivie (41) and Gorman Thomas (38)/Stolen Bases-Paul Molitor (34)

1979: HRs-Gorman Thomas (45)/Stolen Bases-Paul Molitor (33)

1978:HRs-Gorman Thomas (32) and Larry Hisle (34)/Stolen Bases-Paul Molitor (30)

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Current MLB players who have played 10 seasons with one team

pic-braun

Let’s start this blog with a quiz:

There have been 15 players who played one or more games in 10 or more different seasons with the Brewers. Can you name these 15 Brewers who have played 10 or more seasons with the Brew Crew? (Answer below.)

One thing free agency did for baseball was it made staying with one team for an entire career almost a thing of the past. While many players may play 10 or more years in the majors, and some may play more, it’s pretty rare to find more than a handful who stayed with one team for an entire career.

Last season there were 24 players on rosters who had played (or were playing) their 10th season (or more) with that club. Two teams, Boston and Cincinnati, toped this list each with three players with 10 or more seasons with the Reds or Red Sox. For the Reds, Brandon Phillips, Joey Votto and Homer Bailey each had 10 or more campaigns with the team, while David Ortiz, Dustin Pedroia and Clay Buchholz were 10-year players with the Red Sox.

Here’s a look at the 30 MLB franchises and how many 10-year players were with the team in 2016.

3: Boston (Buchholz, Ortiz, Pedroia), Cincinnati (Bailey, Phillips, Votto)
2: Minnesota (Mauer, Perkins), New York Mets (Reyes, Wright), Philadelphia (Howard, Ruiz), St. Louis (Molina, Wainwright)
1: Chicago White Sox (Danks), Detroit (Verlander), Kansas City (Gordon), L.A. Angels (Weaver), L.A. Dodgers (Ethier), Milwaukee (Braun), New York Yankees (Rodriguez), San Francisco (Cain), Seattle (Hernandez), Washington (Zimmerman)
0: Arizona, Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago Cubs, Cleveland, Colorado, Houston, Miami, Oakland, Pittsburgh, San Diego, Tampa Bay, Texas, Toronto

If we look at the list of 24, we see that one-third of these players are no longer with the teams they played for last season. Retirement ended the careers of Alex Rodriguez and David Ortiz, Ryan Howard is still a free agent, and five players have new teams: Brandon Phillips (Atlanta), Carlos Ruiz (Seattle), Clay Buchholz (Philadelphia), Jered Weaver (San Diego) and John Danks (Atlanta).

Now to answer the trivia question at the start of the blog…

Last season Ryan Braun became the 15th Brewers player to play in 10 or more seasons with the team. He joined the following players (numbers of seasons with the Brewers also noted):

20: Robin Yount
17: Jim Gantner
15: Paul Molitor
14: Charlie Moore
12: Jim Slaton
11: Rickie Weeks, Bill Wegman, Cecil Cooper, Gorman Thomas, Don Money
10: Ryan Braun, Geoff Jenkins, Bob McClure, Moose Haas, Jerry Augustine

It’s anyone’s guess whether or not another player will join this above list of Brewers. When you consider that after Braun the player on the current roster with the most seasons with the team is Wily Peralta with five, chances of anyone joining this in the near future is not likely.

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MLB stats: Winning 57 or more games at home

wrigley

With pitchers and catchers reporting this week, the start of baseball in 2017 is upon us. Here’s just a small taste of some baseball analytics to get you ready for the upcoming season.

Two interesting elements of the Chicago Cubs success last season was their dominance at home (57-24) and a 15-5 record in interleague play. Let’s, however, focus on their winning ways at Wrigley Field.

The Cubs last year became the 36th team in MLB history to win 57 or more games at home in a season. They were the first team to reach 57 wins at home since the 2011 Milwaukee Brewers won 57 games at Miller Park that season.

Of the 36 teams that have reached 57 or more wins at home in a season, 23 went on to play in the World Series that year with 12 winning the championship (the Cubs became the 12th team to do so.) That means that 13 of the 36 did not reach the World Series in the season they won 57 or more games at home. The aforementioned 2011 Brewers were the last team to fail to reach the World Series in a season where they won 57 or more games at home..

Here’s a look at the 12 teams to win the World Series in the same year they won 57+ games at home.

Year, Team, Home Wins in that title season
2016 Chicago Cubs, 57
2009 New York Yankees, 57
1998 New York Yankees, 62
1975 Cincinnati Reds, 64
1970 Baltimore Orioles, 59
1961 New York Yankees, 65
1942 St. Louis Cardinals, 60
1937 New York Yankees, 57
1932 New York Yankees, 62
1930 Philadelphia A’s, 58
1929 Philadelphia A’s, 57
1927 New York Yankees, 57

The 1961 Yanks top the list with most wins at home in a season, 65. The ’75 Big Red Machine is next with 64 wins at home. Ten of the 12 teams that won 60 or more games at home in a season eventually made it to the World Series that year with only five winning that crown that year (1932 Yankees, 1942 Cardinals, 1961 Yankees, 1975 Reds and the 1998 Yankees).

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The worst (and best) pro teams this century

prosports

Have the New England Patriots been the best NFL team this century? Which NHL team has been the best since in the beginning of the 21st century? Which NBA team has the best winning percentage since the 1999-2000 season began? Which baseball franchise has won the highest percentage of games since 2000?

The answers to the above questions in a second.

As we get ready to close the book on 2016, I started thinking about which franchises in the four pro sports (MLB, NBA, NFL and NHL) have the worst winning percentages since 2000, or in this century… 17 years’ worth of seasons.

If we go based strictly on winning percentages, the NFL’s Cleveland Browns are the “worst” pro sports franchise this century. The Browns, through games of December 21 (their recent victory over San Diego is not included in these totals) were 85-185, a .315 winning percentage.

Following are the two franchises in each of the four pro sports leagues with the lowest winning percentages since 2000 (for the NHL and NBA, I started with the 1999-2000 seasons).

NFL: Cleveland 85-185, .315; Detroit 96-174, .356.
NBA: Washington 579-827, .412; Minnesota 594-812, .422
MLB: Kansas City 1233-1521, .448; Pittsburgh 1247-1503, .453
NHL: Atlanta .428; Columbus .432.

So how about those with the best winning percentages? As you might have expected, the New England Patriots have been pro sports best team this century, based on winning percentage, compiling a 199-71 record (through games of December 21), a .737 winning percentage. The NBA’s San Antonio Spurs are the only other sports franchise over .700… they are 1002-404, .713.

Here’s a look at the two franchises in each of the four pro sports leagues with the highest winning percentages since 2000.

NFL: New England 199-71, .737; Indianapolis 175-95, .648.
NBA: San Antonio 1002-404, .713; Dallas 886-521, .630.
MLB: New York Yankees 1592-1158, .579; St. Louis 1550-1203, .563.
NHL: Detroit .586; San Jose .557
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