Tag Archives: NFL

Today’s Sportstat: April 25, 2019

TODAY’s SPORTSTAT-April 25, 2019

Packers top NFL with longevity of quarterbacks

Let’s start with a trivia quiz…

With the NFL Draft beginning tonight (April 25), there is a lot of speculation that the Packers will draft another QB, maybe someone they can work with to eventually succeed Aaron Rodgers.

Back in 2005, the Green Bay Packers selected Rodgers in the first round. Since then, the Pack has chosen five different QBs in the draft from 2006-18. Can you name the five quarterbacks the Packers have chosen in the draft after Rodgers? (Answer at the end of this article)

Green Bay QB Aaron Rodgers last season played in his 165th regular season game with the Packers. He became the third Packers QB to play 165 or more games with the team; Green Bay is the only team in NFL history to have three different QBs play 165 or more career games with the team.

There have been 25 quarterbacks who have played 165 or more games with one team. Seventeen of the 32 NFL teams have had at least QB on this list.

Here are the teams that have had at least one QB in their history play 165 or more games with the team.

Bengals: Kenny Anderson
Broncos: John Elway
Cardinals: Jim Hart
Chargers: Dan Fouts and Philip Rivers
Chiefs: Len Dawson
Colts: Peyton Manning and Johnny Unitas
Cowboys: Troy Aikman and Danny White
Dolphins: Dan Marino
Falcons: Matt Ryan
49ers: John Brodie and Joe Montana
Giants: Eli Manning
Packers: Brett Favre, Aaron Rodgers and Bart Starr
Patriots: Tom Brady
Redskins: Sammy Baugh and Joe Theismann
Saints: Drew Brees
Steelers: Terry Bradshaw and Ben Roethlisberger
Vikings: Fran Tarkenton

Answer to trivia quiz: The five quarterbacks selected by the Green Bay Packers in the NFL Draft after Aaron Rodgers was chosen in 2005… 2006-Ingle Martin, 5th Round; 2008-Brian Brohm, 2nd Round, Matt Flynn, 7th Round; 2012-B.J. Coleman, 7th Round; 2015-Brett Hundley, 5th Round.

 

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

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Today’s Sportstat: January 31, 2019

Super Bowl 53 MVP? Brady? Goff? Other?

If you are looking to predict who might be the MVP of the Super Bowl this year, you won’t go wrong by picking either of the opposing QBs… Tom Brady or Jared Goff. In the past 52 Super Bowls, there have been 29 quarterbacks chosen as the MVP, well over half of those honored.

But there’s more to the story. Here’s a handful of stats you may not know about QBs and the Super Bowl MVP Award. Did you know…

  • Joe Namath is the only Super Bowl MVP QB who did not throw a TD pass in that game.
  • Of the 53 Super Bowl winning quarterbacks who threw five or more passes in the game (the Baltimore Colts in 1971 had QBs Earl Morrall and Johnny Unitas each attempt five or more passes in that game), 45 had at least one TD pass in the game.
  • Every Super Bowl winning QB who threw three or more TD passes in the game was selected as the MVP… one threw six TD passes (Steve Young), one threw five TD passes (Joe Montana), four had four TD passes, and seven had three TD passes. That’s 13 of the 13 Super Bowl winning QBs who had three or more TD passes was selected as the game’s MVP.
  • Of the 15 Super Bowl winning QBs who had two TD passes in the game, eight were chosen as the game’s MVP. Of the 17 Super Bowl winning QBs who had one TD pass in the game, seven were chosen as the MVP. Eight Super Bowl winning QBs did not have a TD pass in the game.
  • Of the 28 Super Bowl winning QBs who had two or more TD passes in the game, 21 went on to win the MVP… that’s 75%. Good odds for any Super Bowl winning QB who can get at least two TD passes on his stat line.

There have been a few Super Bowl winning QBs who, statistically speaking, did not have very impressive games. Topping that list would probably be Pittsburgh’s Ben Roethlisberger. In the Steelers’ 2006 Super Bowl win over Seattle, Roethlisberger had a Passer Rating of 22.6, the lowest Passer Rating of any Super Bowl winning QB. He had no TD passes and two interceptions in the game.

Following are the five Super Bowl winning QBs who had the lowest Passer Rating in the contest.

Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh, 2006… 22.6
John Elway, Denver, 1998… 51.9
Earl Morrall, Baltimore, 1971… 54.0
Peyton Manning, Denver, 2016… 56.6
Joe Theismann, Washington, 1983… 75.1

In addition, did you know…

  • Four Super Bowl winning QBs completed less than 50% of their passes in the big game: Roethlisberger 42.9% (2006), Morrall 46.7% (1971), Terry Bradshaw 47.4% (1976) and Trent Dilfer 48.0% (2001).
  • Eight Super Bowl winning QBs did not have a TD pass in the game: Roethlisberger (2006), Elway (1998), Peyton Manning (2016), Morrall (1971), Namath (1969), Troy Aikman (1994), Jim McMahon (1986), Bob Griese (1974).
  • Four Super Bowl winning QBs had multiple interceptions in the game: Bradshaw (three in 1980… he was still selected MVP in the game); Tom Brady (two in 2005… also selected MVP of the game); Joe Theismann (two in 1983); and Roethlisberger (two in 2006).

Just to add a little balance to this piece, there have been six Super Bowl losing QBs who had three TD passes in the game: Roger Staubach (1979), Brett Favre (1998), Jake Delhomme (2004), Donovan McNabb (2005), Kurt Warner (2009) and Tom Brady (2018).

 

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

It’s time to change the NFL’s OT rule

by Jerry Tapp

Let me preface what I’m about to say with this one statement: I am not a die-hard Kansas City Chiefs fan.

With that out of the way, something has to be done about the ridiculous overtime rule in the NFL. We saw it firsthand this past weekend when the Chiefs and New England went into OT in their AFC Championship Game. By winning the coin toss, the Patriots got the ball first and drove down for a TD, thus ending the game. The Chiefs did not get a chance to even touch the ball on offense.

This has been the rule for some time now. And it’s now time to change it. It’s time to make sure that each team, especially in the playoffs, get at least one time to have possession.

Think about it: In what other sport does a team that wins a coin toss get to have possession and then can win a game without their opponents even having a chance? Baseball? Nope. If the game goes into extra innings, both teams get to bat. Think of the outrage if MLB changed the rule and the first team that scored in extra innings would win (that would have to be the road team in this case). Stupid, right? You bet. At least in baseball each team gets an at-bat in extra innings. If the road team scores a run in the top of the 10th, the home team must either score one or two runs or the game is over.

Basketball? No, again. There is a five-minute overtime period in the NBA. Both teams get multiple chances to handle the ball. How about we change the rule and the first team that scores wins the game? Absurd, right? You bet.

Even in the NHL, there is sudden death. But I think it’s pretty rare that a team would win an OT face-off and would immediately score a goal without the other team handling the puck.

Winning a coin toss should never be the factor in a team winning a game in OT, again, especially in the playoffs. Why the NFL would think that this is okay is beyond me. I know in biblical times they would cast lots if an important decision had to be made, but I don’t think the NFL based their OT rule on Old Testament biblical principles. I could be wrong, but I don’t think I am.

As it states right now, the team that wins the coin toss in an NFL overtime game wins if they score a TD. If that team has to punt or commits a turnover, or if they kick a field goal, the other team has a chance to have possession. I say that even if that team that wins the toss scores a TD, let the other team have a possession. If they don’t score a TD, then the game is over. If they do score a TD, then, and only then, do you make the game sudden death. At least each team had one possession. If you want to reward the team for winning the coin toss, at least let the other team get one possession. What happens after that is fair game.

For Patrick Mahomes not to get a chance to match Tom Brady’s overtime drive just seemed wrong. Both teams need to get a fair shot. If the NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball can make sure that their overtime (or extra inning format) is fair for both teams, the NFL has to figure out a way to get on par with its fellow professional sports.

Other people are advocating the NFL go to the overtime system used by college football. I’m okay with that as well. At least both teams have the same chance to win.

But the way things are now in the NFL, the way this year’s AFC Championship Game ended (and the way other OT games have ended in past where only one team had possession) has to be changed. There are people a lot smarter than me that should be able to figure out a plausible way to play overtime.

If, however, the NFL comes out and says its overtime policy is based on Old Testament principles and the coin toss must remain in its current form, well, then I guess divine intervention has spoken. I highly doubt that is the case.

We lost out on a possible terrific scenario when Mahomes and the Chiefs did not get a chance to match the Pats. Heck, I would’ve watched another hour of the game if both teams marched up and down the field matching TD in OT. Must-see TV? You betcha.

It may not have lessened the outcry from fans who thought the officiating in both title games was sub-par, but at least we wouldn’t be listening to the ever-present outrage because of a stupid overtime policy.

NFL… The ball is in your court. Or should I say, you have possession. Let’s end this discussion about how unfair the overtime format is once and for all.

Today’s Sportstat: January 17, 2019

How many points will a team need to score to win the AFC or NFC title game?

We’re down to the final three games of the NFL season: In the AFC, the New England Patriots will travel to Kansas City to face the Chiefs; in the NFC, the New Orleans Saints will host the Los Angeles Rams. The winners will square off in the Super Bowl.

Since the NFC-AFC merger back in 1970, it appears that if a team scored 20 or more points in a conference championship game, they had a pretty good chance of winning the game and advancing to the Super Bowl. Since 1970, teams that scored 20 or more points were 82-25 (.766 winning percentage) in the conference title game. In the AFC Championship Games since ’70, teams that scored 20 or more were 43-11 (.796) while NFC teams playing in the title game were 39-14 (.736) when they scored 20+ points in the title contest.

Here’s a breakdown of record of teams in each conference championship game based on the number of points they scored in the contest.

Points scored             AFC                     NFC                     Total

0-9                                 0-10                     1-16                     1-26 .037

10-19                             5-27                     8-18                     13-45 .224

20-29                            26-9                     21-14                    47-23 .671

30-39                            12-2                     14-0                     26-2 .929

40 or more points         5-0                       4-0                       9-0 1.000

As you can see, only two teams that scored 30 or more points in a championship game since 1970 lost the title game: Indianapolis defeated the New England Patriots 38-34 in 2006 and the Denver beat Cleveland in a 1987 season title game, 38-33. The only team to win a conference title game by scoring fewer than 10 points were the Rams in 1979; they defeated Tampa Bay 9-0.

Following are 10 stats you may not know concerning the AFC and NFC Championship Games since the 1970 merger:

Most appearances: AFC (Pittsburgh, 16), NFC (San Francisco, 15)

Most wins: AFC (New England, 10), NFC (Dallas, 8)

Most losses: AFC (Pittsburgh, 8), NFC (San Francisco, 9)Last title: AFC (NY Jets, Jacksonville, Cleveland and Kansas City have never won an AFC Championship Game; Miami has the longest drought of teams that have previously won a title since 1970… they last won in 1984/ NFC (Detroit has never won an NFC Championship Game since 1970; Minnesota has the longest drought of teams that have previously won a title since 1970… they last won in 1976.

Most home games: AFC (Pittsburgh, 11), NFC (San Francisco, 9)

Most home wins: AFC (New England, 7), NFC (Washington, 5)

Most home losses: AFC (Pittsburgh, 5), NFC (San Francisco, 5)

Most away games: AFC (New England & the Raiders, 6 each), NFC (Dallas, 9)

Most away wins: AFC (New Englland, 3), NFC (Dallas, 4)

Most away losses: AFC (Raiders, 5), NFC (Dallas and Minnesota, 5 each)

 

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp

Today’s Sportstat: January 7, 2019

Eight teams remain in the quest to crown the NFL champion for the 2018 season. With four games this weekend, a win will put teams in the AFC Championship or NFC Championship game.

Of the eight teams remaining (Dallas, Indianapolis, Kansas City, L.A. Chargers, L.A. Rams, England, New Orleans and Philadelphia), two of those teams, Dallas and Kansas City, have not played in a Championship Game this century. The Cowboys last played in the NFC Championship Game in 1995, while the Chiefs were last in the AFC Championship Game in 1993.

There are 24 NFL teams whose 2018 season has already ended. Of those 24 teams, the Cincinnati Bengals have the longest drought since a Championship Game appearance. The Bengals last appeared in the AFC Championship Game in 1988, a span of now 30 seasons without playing in a championship contest. The NFC teams with the longest championship drought are the Detroit Lions and Washington Redskins… they last appeared (and faced off against each other) in the 1991 NFC title game.

All but one of the current 32 NFL teams has played in an AFC or NFC championship game in their franchise history. The Houston Texans have never played in an AFC Championship Game in their history that began in 2002.

Following is a list of the last season each NFL franchise appeared in either an AFC Championship Game or NFC Championship Game (teams are noted by current franchise city).

Never: Houston Texans (franchise began in 2002)

1988: Cincinnati Bengals

1989: Cleveland Browns

1991: Detroit Lions, Washington Redskins

1992: Miami Dolphins

1993: Buffalo Bills, Kansas City Chiefs

1995: Dallas Cowboys

2001: L.A. Rams

2002: Oakland Raiders, Tampa Bay Bucs, Tennessee Titans

2007: L.A. Chargers

2009: New Orleans Saints

2010: Chicago Bears, New York Jets

2011: New York Giants

2012: Baltimore Ravens

2013: San Francisco 49ers

2014: Indianapolis Colts, Seattle Seahawks

2015: Arizona Cardinals, Carolina Panthers, Denver Broncos

2016: Atlanta Falcons, Green Bay Packers, Pittsburgh Steelers

2017: Jacksonville Jaguars, Minnesota Vikings, New England Patriots, Philadelphia Eagles

 

Follow Jerry on Twitter @StatsonTapp